Hunter: Ah phew! Everyone is talking Swedish again.
Me: That’s because we’re in Sweden.
Hunter: Well that’s no excuse.
The rumours are true. We’re headed back to Älmhult!
I’m starting a new job at IKEA of Sweden, Hunter’s going back to his old Montessori school. Good times and snowy days ahead.

The rumours are true. We’re headed back to Älmhult!

I’m starting a new job at IKEA of Sweden, Hunter’s going back to his old Montessori school. Good times and snowy days ahead.

Do we really want all those things back? #day2of3

Hej då to the big blue box

Hej då to the big blue box

Last visit to the secondhand store. Hej då Swedish hand-me-downs.

Last visit to the secondhand store. Hej då Swedish hand-me-downs.

Rescued a wounded dragonfly on the road. All in a day’s work.

Rescued a wounded dragonfly on the road. All in a day’s work.

Snake on a stick

Snake on a stick

First day at school. Here we go!
Hunter started ‘big school’ today and, as we’re moving back to the UK in a few weeks, it will be interesting to see how the different experiences stack up. Here are a few things I will miss on his behalf about his Swedish school:1) No uniform - I doubt I’ll ever be convinced that putting kids in uniform is a good idea. 2) No fence - the playground includes the usual play stuff, a ping-pong table and some woods, but it is not fenced in. I’ll admit this one has taken me quite some time to acclimatise to but, as someone who hated the feeling of being penned in at school, I appreciate the responsibility it gives to the child. 3) No playing indoors - rain, shine, or snow, the kids play outside every single day. All it takes is the proper clothing and a drying cupboard in the school to take care of the odd soggy sock incident. (Spare clothes are kept at school for such events.)4) No fees - it’s a Montessori school and it’s free. Sweden incorporates schools with different pedagogical approaches into the state-funded system so you don’t have to be monied to have a choice.

First day at school. Here we go!

Hunter started ‘big school’ today and, as we’re moving back to the UK in a few weeks, it will be interesting to see how the different experiences stack up. Here are a few things I will miss on his behalf about his Swedish school:

1) No uniform - I doubt I’ll ever be convinced that putting kids in uniform is a good idea.

2) No fence - the playground includes the usual play stuff, a ping-pong table and some woods, but it is not fenced in. I’ll admit this one has taken me quite some time to acclimatise to but, as someone who hated the feeling of being penned in at school, I appreciate the responsibility it gives to the child.

3) No playing indoors - rain, shine, or snow, the kids play outside every single day. All it takes is the proper clothing and a drying cupboard in the school to take care of the odd soggy sock incident. (Spare clothes are kept at school for such events.)

4) No fees - it’s a Montessori school and it’s free. Sweden incorporates schools with different pedagogical approaches into the state-funded system so you don’t have to be monied to have a choice.

The window as waiting ode to the sun.

The window as waiting ode to the sun.

Viking ship ahoy! Another great piece of Älmhult art history from Elme Glasbruk, by John Käll.

Viking ship ahoy! Another great piece of Älmhult art history from Elme Glasbruk, by John Käll.

Minor tomato obsession.

Minor tomato obsession.

Gorgeous pressed glass sun-catcher. Made here in Älmhult by John Käll for Elme Glasbruk in the 1960s. Tack Anna & Haldor for introducing me to this fabulous bit of local art history.

Gorgeous pressed glass sun-catcher. Made here in Älmhult by John Käll for Elme Glasbruk in the 1960s. Tack Anna & Haldor for introducing me to this fabulous bit of local art history.

At our favourite park, by the lake in Växjö.

Everyone wants in on sausages, chips & beans for tea! Thanks Auntie ‘Ouisie for the horse x

Everyone wants in on sausages, chips & beans for tea! Thanks Auntie ‘Ouisie for the horse x

Trampoline static, halo hair.
“I look like the sun”, he said.
You look like a nutter, I thought.

Trampoline static, halo hair.
“I look like the sun”, he said.
You look like a nutter, I thought.